WHAT IS BLACK TEA

Black tea is a type of tea that is more oxidized than oolong, green, and white teas. Black tea is generally stronger in flavour than the less oxidized teas. All four types are made from leaves of the shrub (or small tree) Camellia sinensis. Two principal varieties of the species are used – the small-leaved Chinese variety plant (C. sinensis var. sinensis), used for most other types of teas, and the large-leaved Assamese plant (C. sinensis var. assamica), which was traditionally mainly used for black tea, although in recent years some green and white teas have been produced.

VARIETIES OF BLACK TEA

HEALTH BENEFITS OF BLACK TEA

Black tea also offers a variety of health benefits because it contains antioxidants and compounds that can help reduce inflammation in the body.

  • Has Antioxidant Properties
  • Can Boost Heart Health
  • Can Lower “Bad” LDL Cholesterol
  • Can Improve Gut Health
  • Can Help Reduce Blood Pressure
  • Can Help Reduce the Risk of Stroke
  • Can Lower Blood Sugar Levels
  • Can Help Reduce the Risk of Cancer
  • Can Improve Focus
  • Easy to Make

HOW TO BREW A PERFECT CUP OF BLACK TEA

Generally, 4 grams (0.14 oz) of tea per 200 ml (7.0 imp fl oz; 6.8 US fl oz) of water.[15] Unlike green teas, which turn bitter when brewed at higher temperatures, black tea should be steeped in water brought up to 90–95 °C. The first brew should be 60 sec., the second brew 40 sec., and the third brew 60 sec. If the tea is of high quality, it may be brewed several times by progressively adding 10 sec. to the brew time following the third infusion (note: when using a larger tea pot the ratio of tea to water will need to be adjusted to achieve similar results).

Standard black tea brewing

Brew temperature 90-95 °C
Standard 200 ml water
4 g of tea
Brew times: 60-40-60-70-80-(+10) seconds
A cold vessel lowers the steep temperature; to avoid this, always rinse the vessel with +90 °C (+194 °F) water before brewing.

The more delicate black teas, such as Darjeeling, should be steeped for 3 to 4 minutes. The same holds for broken leaf teas, which have more surface area and need less brewing time than whole leaves. Whole-leaf black teas, and black teas to be served with milk or lemon, should be steeped 4 to 5 minutes.[16] Longer steeping times makes the tea bitter (at this point, it is referred to as being “stewed” in the UK). When the tea has brewed long enough to suit the drinker’s taste, it should be strained before serving.